People



People

Laureate Team



Alison Bashford

Alison Bashford is Laureate Professor of History at the University of New South Wales, Sydney and Director of the Laureate Centre for History & Population. Prof. Bashford’s research connects the history of science, global history, and environmental history into new assessments of the modern world, from the eighteenth to the twentieth centuries. Her books, most recently The New Worlds of Thomas Robert Malthus (with Joyce E. Chaplin, Princeton University Press, 2016) and Global Population: History, Geopolitics and Life on Earth (Columbia University Press, 2014), offer large-scale and integrated analyses of how the twenty-first-century world came to be.


Jarrod Hore

Jarrod Hore is the Interim Manager of the Laureate Centre for History & Population at UNSW. He is an environmental historian of settler colonial landscapes, nature writing, and geology who was previously the Mitchell Fellow at the State Library of New South Wales (2020). His work on wilderness photography, early environmentalism, and the Romantic tradition in the antipodes has been published in Australian Historical Studies, History Australia and the Australian Book Review. Jarrod holds a PhD from Macquarie University and is currently completing a book, Visions of Nature: How Landscape Photography Made Territoriality in Australasia and California (University of California Press), due for release in 2021.


Laureate Visiting Fellows



Duncan Kelly (2021)

Duncan Kelly is the 2021 Senior Laureate Visiting Fellow at the Centre for History & Population at UNSW. Kelly is Professor of Political Thought and Intellectual History at the University of Cambridge and Fellow of Jesus College. His research explores intellectual history and political theory, particularly of the second half of the 19th century and the early 20th century. His books include Politics and the Anthropocene (Polity, 2019) and The Propriety of Liberty: Persons, Passions and Judgement in Modern Political Thought (Princeton University Press, 2011).


Laureate Senior Research Associates



Pratik Chakrabarti

Pratik Chakrabarti is Chair in History of Science and Medicine at the Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine, University of Manchester. He has contributed widely to the history of science, medicine, and global and imperial history, spanning South Asian, Caribbean and Atlantic history from the eighteenth to the twentieth century. Prof. Chakrabarti’s books include Inscriptions of Nature: Geology and the Naturalization of Antiquity (Johns Hopkins, 2020), Medicine and Empire, 1600-1960 (Palgrave, 2014), and Bacteriology in British India: Laboratory Medicine and the Tropics (University of Rochester Press, 2012).


Aya Homei

Aya Homei is Lecturer in Japanese Studies at the University of Manchester. She specialises in the history of East Asian science, technology, and medicine, with particular interests in the history of midwifery, discourses on Japanese population, Japanese family planning in Southeast Asia, and the science of old age. Dr Homei has published articles in Social History of Medicine, East Asian Science, Technology and Medicine, and Medical Mycology and authored the book, Fungal Disease in Britain and the United States, 1850-200: Mycoses and Modernity (with Michael Worboys, Palgrave, 2013).


John Pullen

John Pullen is Adjunct Associate Professor at the University of New England Business School. His research interests include urban economics, the history of economic thought, and Thomas Robert Malthus. Prof. Pullen is the editor of Malthus’ correspondence and of numerous editions of the Principles of Political Economy.


Louise Edwards

Louise Edwards is Emeritus Professor of Chinese History at UNSW. She publishes on women and gender in China and Asia. Prof. Edwards is a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Humanities, The Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia and the Hong Kong Academy of the Humanities. Her most recent books include Drawing Democratic Dreams in Republican China (Washington University Press, 2020), Women Politics and Democracy: Women’s Suffrage in China (Stanford University Press, 2008), and Women Warriors and Wartime Spies of China (Cambridge, 2016).


Duncan Kelly

Duncan Kelly is the 2021 Senior Laureate Visiting Fellow at the Centre for History & Population at UNSW. Kelly is Professor of Political Thought and Intellectual History at the University of Cambridge and Fellow of Jesus College. His research explores intellectual history and political theory, particularly of the second half of the 19th century and the early 20th century. His books include Politics and the Anthropocene (Polity, 2019) and The Propriety of Liberty: Persons, Passions and Judgement in Modern Political Thought (Princeton University Press, 2011).


Samita Sen

Samita Sen is Vere Harmsworth Professor of Imperial and Naval History, Trinity College, University of Cambridge. She has published extensively on gender and labour. Her specialization is colonial South Asia but she has also done contemporary and interdisciplinary research on issues such as domestic violence and labour in the informal sector. She is a member of editorial boards of various academic journals, including Modern Asian Studies and South Asian History and Culture. Her first monograph, Women and Labour in Late Colonial India: The Bengal Jute Industry (Cambridge University Press, 1999) won the Trevor Reese Prize in Commonwealth History.


Shailaja Fennell

Shailaja Fennell is Director of Research at the Cambridge Central Asia Forum, Reader in Regional Transformation and Economic Security at the University of Cambridge, and Fellow of Jesus College. Her research interests include institutional reform and collective action, food production and rural development; gender norms and gender gaps in development interventions, and provision of public goods and the role of partnerships. Dr Fennell’s books include Rules, Rubrics and Riches: The Interrelations between Legal Reform and International Development (Routledge, 2010).  


Angela Leung

Angela Leung is Director of the Hong Kong Institute of Humanities and Social Sciences and Joseph Needham-Philip Mao Professor at the University of Hong Kong. She has published in Chinese, English and French on the history of Chinese philanthropy and social history of medicine. Prof. Leung’s books include Leprosy in China: A History (Columbia University Press, 2009) and In Face of Illness (in Chinese, Renmin University Press, 2012).


Kavita Sivaramakrishnan

Kavita Sivaramakrishnan is Associate Professor, Sociomedical Sciences at the Mailman School of Public Health and Director of Program in Global Health and Ageing at Columbia University. Her interests and expertise are in the contemporary history of medicine and science in South Asia, the politics of infectious disease and epidemics, and the history of population anxieties in global health. Her books include As the World Ages: The Making of a Global Demographic Crisis (Harvard University Press, 2018) and Old Potions, New Bottles: Recasting Indigenous Medicine in Colonial Punjab (Orient Longman, 2006).  


Geoff Harcourt

Geoff Harcourt AO is Visiting Professorial Fellow, UNSW Business School, Emeritus Reader in the History of Economic Theory, Cambridge, Emeritus Fellow, Jesus College, and Professor Emeritus, Adelaide University. His research interests include history of economic theory, intellectual biography, and Post-Keynesian theory and policy. He has authored, co-authored, edited or co-edited 29 volumes, as well as over 350 articles, book chapters, and reviews. Prof. Harcourt is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences in Australia and in the United Kingdom, an Officer of the Order of Australia, and a Distinguished Fellow of the Economic Society of Australia, The History of Economics Society USA, The European Society for the History of Economic Thought and The History of Economic Thought Society of Australia.


David Nally

David Nally is a Senior Lecturer in Geography at the University of Cambridge University and Fellow of Jesus College. His research has addressed colonial authority and subsistence crises, global land grabbing, technology and agrarian systems, and the relationships between population control and food production. Dr Nally’s books include Human Encumbrances: Political Violence and the Great Irish Famine (Notre Dame Press, 2011) and Key Concepts in Historical Geography (with John Morrissey, Ulf Strohmayer, and Yvonne Whelan, Sage, 2014).


Simon Szreter

Simon Szreter is Professor in History and Public Policy at the University of Cambridge and Fellow of St John’s College. His main fields of research are demographic, public health, economic and social history, the history of empirical social science and methods for registering and measuring populations, and the relationship between history and contemporary public policy issues. Prof. Szreter’s books include Fertility, Class and Gender in Britain 1860-1940 (Cambridge University Press, 1996) and Health and Wealth: Studies in History and Policy (Rochester University Press, 2005).


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